Lindsay McIntyre, Her Silent Life (film still), 2012, 16mm film. Courtesy of the artist.

Lindsay McIntyre, Her Silent Life (film still), 2012, 16mm film. Courtesy of the artist

Lindsay McIntyre, Her Silent Life (film still), 2012, 16mm film. Courtesy of the artist

Lindsay McIntyre, Where She Stood (film still), 2011, 16mm film. Courtesy of the artist

Lindsay McIntyre, What Travelled Through Time, 2020, lightbox with laserjet print, edition of 3 and 1 AP, 96.52 x 58.42 x 10.16 cm. Courtesy of the Artist and Marion Scott Gallery.

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Lindsay McIntyre, Her Silent Life (film still), 2012, 16mm film. Courtesy of the artist.

Lindsay McIntyre, Her Silent Life (film still), 2012, 16mm film. Courtesy of the artist

Lindsay McIntyre, Her Silent Life (film still), 2012, 16mm film. Courtesy of the artist

Lindsay McIntyre, Where She Stood (film still), 2011, 16mm film. Courtesy of the artist

Lindsay McIntyre, What Travelled Through Time, 2020, lightbox with laserjet print, edition of 3 and 1 AP, 96.52 x 58.42 x 10.16 cm. Courtesy of the Artist and Marion Scott Gallery.

Selected

Lindsay McIntyre: The Tool of Tools

Virtual

Please note that this exhibition is by appointment only to flatten the curve of COVID-19. Please contact the gallery [email protected] to schedule a viewing.

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The opening reception will be hosted virtually through Marion Scott Gallery’s instagram on Saturday, April 4 at 7 pm.

In recent years, artists of Inuit heritage have been moving to the forefront of the art world in Canada. Long known for their carving, printmaking, and in recent decades, for drawing practices, now Inuit voices are being heard across the country and around the world as they tell their stories of personal and cultural change in the modern age of colonialism.

Set within the context of a commercial gallery with a forty-five year history of working with Inuit artists, Lindsay McIntyre’s deeply intimate filmic exploration of family history is part of a new contemporary expression. Inuit artists today speak not only of life on the land in the North but also of the diasporic experience.

Much of McIntyre’s extensive catalogue represents a parallel investigation into her personal identity and family history as well as celluloid itself, its processes, and associated mechanisms—manipulating at various steps in hand developing process of 16mm film and being the “one-woman machine” behind every role behind the camera. McIntyre’s richly textured, grainy, or diaphanous imagery is more visual art than cinema, with marks and signature characteristics showing the hand of the artist as much one would expect to see in carving or painting.

For this exhibition, outtakes from films are mounted in lightboxes, bringing the work into the discourse now intrinsic to that form and inseparable from Vancouver’s history of photography. A live performance of the original 16mm projected celluloid will take place during the exhibition.

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